Universities’ Supreme Council orders heads of universities to purge Muslim Brotherhood members

22

Egypt’s Universities’ Supreme Council ordered the heads of both governmental and private universities to prepare lists of employees who belong to the Muslim Brotherhood or other groups categorised as terrorist in Egypt so that the council can kick them out according to a recent controversial law.

The council issued a statement that its decision comes in line with the recent amendment of law 10 of 1972, regarding non-disciplinary dismissal of public employees, passed by the parliament weeks ago.

On 12 July, the parliament approved finally a bill that would enable any public employee who is proved to belong to the Muslim Brotherhood and other “terrorist” groups to be dismissed. The law raised controversy as it violates the constitution that bans discrimination between citizens according to their political attitudes.

The new amendment permits kicking any employee out if he was inserted on the terrorism lists, which Egypt started to make in 2015 according to the terrorist entities law, which used indefinite definitions of terrorism to involve opponents and opposition media, think tanks and so on, on terrorism lists, despite the fact they are mainly secular peaceful activists.

The new legislation was said to violate Article 53 of the Egyptian constitution that bans discrimination according to politics and Article 65 that guarantees freedom of expression and thought. The legislation targets Egyptian opponents, especially the Muslim Brotherhood, to purge them from the state apparatus so that Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi can guarantee loyalty to the state in a step which can be considered an expropriation of the state.